Cat saves Bakersfield boy from dog attack

May 14, 2014 | 8:53 am


Dog bite attacks can happen at any moment as evidenced by a Bakersfield video that has gone viral.

A cat came to the rescue of a boy when he was attacked in his driveway in southwest Bakersfield home. Surveillance video shows the boy playing on his bicycle in his front yard when a dog sneaks up behind him and grabs his leg.

The family’s cat, named Tara, according to KERO-23 (ABC) defends the boy, attacks the dog and chases it away. The boy’s mother told KERO that the boy was taken to a hospital and needed 10 stitches, but is doing fine now. The boy’s mother also was bit by the dog after she rescued her son.

The family spoke with The Bakersfield Californian, describing Tara as normally a tame cat.

“My cat, I have no idea where she was prior, honestly through the heat of it, I have no idea where she went after. Full lion safari moment,” the mother said.

The dog belonged to a neighbor, who took it to a local animal shelter, and it is now being quarantined for 10 days, The Bakersfield Californian reported

UPDATE: Since first appearing this morning, the video continues to spread through the web world and various media, from Los Angeles to Sacramento to San Francisco to New York. Other popular media including Time MagazineHuffington Post, and USA Today have also made mentions of the incident. It even reached the United Kingdom.

Tara the car also has earned her very own Facebook page that’s gotten tens of thousands of likes. The Bakersfield Californian reported on Tara’s quick rise in popularity worldwide.

Legal issues

“National Dog Bite Prevention Week” is from May 18 to 24 this year. According to State Farm insurance, California tops the list of states reporting the most dog bite claims, The Bakersfield Californian reported. 

The top 5 states for State Farm dog bite claims in 2013 were:

  • California — 449 claims $14.7 million paid
  • Illinois — 309 claims $8.9 million paid
  • Ohio — 221 claims $4.2 million paid
  • Texas — 207 claims $4.0 million paid
  • Pennsylvania — 180 claims $5.8 million paid

The Bakersfield dog bite and attack lawyers at Chain | Cohn | Stiles are well-equipped to handle personal injury cases involving animal attacks, most commonly dog bite cases. Statistically speaking, children under the age of 10 are at the highest risk for experiencing severe and often permanent impairments from a dog attack.

The attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles have compiled several frequently asked questions that may help you in the case you or a loved one experiences such an incident.

Who can sue in an animal bite or animal knock-down case?

Any person, whether a minor or adult, who has been bitten or knocked down by an animal who has been improperly or inadequately leashed or contained can sue for injuries or death caused by an animal bite or knock-down.

Who can I sue?

If you were injured or a family member was injured or killed by any animal, you can sue the person who has or should have had control of the animal. For a person to be responsible they need not be the owner of the animal. However, an owner who retains some control over the animal remains liable even if the animal is partly under the care of others.

 Are there special protections under the law for people who are bitten by dogs?

Yes. California has a statute that holds that the “owner of a dog is liable for the damages suffered by anyone who is bitten by the dog while in a public place or lawfully in a private place, including the dog owner’s property, regardless of the prior viciousness of the dog or the owner’s knowledge of that viciousness.” Thus, the owner of a dog is strictly liable for anyone who is injured or killed by a dog bite. You do not have to prove that the owner was negligent. Although the dog bite statute does not apply to the person in possession or control of a dog, that person can still be found liable for your injuries if he or she was negligent in controlling or containing the dog.

 Is there a law that protects me and my family if we are attacked by any animal other than a dog?

Yes. The keeper of an animal of a species that is dangerous by nature, or that the keeper knows or has reason to know has dangerous propensities or traits, is strictly liable to anyone injured as a result of those propensities or traits. This rule provides greater protection than the dog bite statute, because it applies to keepers other than owners and animals other than dogs, including horses.

 My child suffered a severe injury after being knocked down by a large dog owned by a neighbor. Can my child bring a lawsuit and recover for his or her injuries?

Yes. If you can establish that the dog had dangerous propensities or traits you will be able to maintain a strict liability case against the owner and will not have to prove negligence. Further, the owner can be held responsible for negligence if you can prove that the owner failed to exercise ordinary care in controlling the dog. This can include failure to warn you and your child of the dog’s dangerous traits, failing to ascertain whether the dog had a dangerous propensity, failing to restrain a dangerous dog, or engaging in conduct likely to excite the dog causing him to knock down your child.

Further, if the dog was unleashed and you were in a city with a leash law, there will be a presumption that the owner was negligent in causing your child’s injuries.

 My aunt was walking down the street when a dog ran out of the house and charged at her. My aunt attempted to run away but tripped, fell and broke her hip. The dog never touched my aunt. Is she entitled to bring a lawsuit against the dog owner?

Although this may be a difficult case to prove, your aunt should be able to bring a case if she reasonably feared for her safety and she can prove that the owner or possessor of the dog knew or should have known of the dog’s propensity to attack people walking on the sidewalk and failed to act appropriately.

 My child was bitten by a dog when he crossed through my neighbor’s back yard to get to our house without being invited. Can he bring a lawsuit even though he was a trespasser?

Yes, but only if you can establish that your neighbor was negligent in leaving his dog in the back yard and that he knew or should have known that children would cross through his back yard. This will still be a difficult case, and you will not have the benefit of the strict liability rules that apply to other dog bite cases since trespassers are excluded under the dog bite statute.

What damages are recoverable in animal bite cases?

A Plaintiff is entitled to recover damages for past and future and medical expenses, past and future wage loss, past and future pain and suffering, and if it is deemed that conduct is bad enough, punitive damages (i.e., punishment damages against the defendant). If the victim dies, his or her survivors are entitled to recover full compensation for their economic losses that result from the victim’s death, as well as emotional distress damages which stem from the loss of society, care, and comfort of the decedent. If the survivors can prove that the victim lived for a period of time between the negligent act and death, they can also bring an action for punitive damages.

If you or someone you know has been injured in an animal attack, contact our Kern County personal injury law firm immediately.