Chain | Cohn | Stiles joins MADD Kern County in honoring locals fighting against DUI crimes

June 12, 2019 | 2:48 pm


Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), Kern County recognized and honored our local law enforcement officers, prosecutors, and other community members on Wednesday at Hodel’s Country Dining for their valiant efforts in helping stop DUI crimes.

In all, 67 officers from throughout Kern County agencies were awarded during the 2019 MADD Kern County Law Enforcement and Prosecutor Recognition luncheon, as well as a prosecutor from the Kern County District Attorney’s Office.  Awards were handed out to the top prosecutor, top probation officer, and the top law enforcement officer, among others.

“There are numerous ways we as a community can come together to fight against DUI crimes, whether it’s through law enforcement and prosecution, serving as a designated driver, or helping raise awareness of the DUI epidemic in Kern County,” said Carla Pearson, victim services specialist for MADD Kern County. “It’s important we acknowledge and award the special efforts made here. Simply, these people are saving lives.”

The award recipients were as follows (for a full awards list, scroll to the bottom of this post):

  • Top DUI Arresting Officer: Officer Robert Tyo, Bakersfield Police Department, 223 DUI arrests
  • Prosecutor of the Year: Kim Richardson, Kern County District Attorney’s Office
  • Probation Department Award: Brian Mara, DUI Program Supervisor
  • Community Champion Award: Jeff Platt, Eyewitness News
  • Top CHP Officer: Officer Rodney Black (Bakersfield), 117 DUI arrests

The awards ceremony was organized by MADD Kern County volunteers, and made possible by the financial support of local sponsors: Chain | Cohn | Stiles, Chevron, Ira and Carole Cohen with UBS Financial, Kern County Prosecutors Association, and Michael Yraceburn and Sally Herald CPA.

Since 2009, our community has seen at least 4,000 DUI arrests made each year, with nearly 4,400 DUI arrests in 2018, according to the Kern County District Attorney’s Office. That’s 12 DUI arrests per day. For the rate of DUI-related fatal collisions per 100,000 people, Kern County ranks highest in the state and second highest in the nation.

The awards luncheon is one of two MADD Kern County signature events aimed to bring awareness of the DUI epidemic in our community, and fight toward ending DUI crimes here. The second event, Walk Like MADD & MADD Dash, will take place this year on Saturday, Sept. 28, at Park at River Walk.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles for many years has partnered with MADD Kern County to combat DUI crashes. Attorney Matt Clark sits on the MADD Kern County Advisory Board and regularly speaks to DUI offenders during the MADD Victim Impact Panels, and law firm marketing director is the planning committee chairman for the annual. Walk Like MADD & MADD Dash. For its work has been recognized and honored on several occasions:

  • MADD Kern County honored Chain | Cohn | Stiles with a “Community Champion” award during the 2018 Kern County MADD Law Enforcement and Prosecutor Recognition luncheon ceremony for the law firm’s work toward raising awareness locally and helping victims.
  • The law firm was also nominated in the “Corporation of the Year” category for a 2018 Beautiful Bakersfield Award, which recognizes a company whose volunteer hours and/or financial donations have made a meaningful difference.
  • Jorge Barrientos, director of marketing and public relations for Chain | Cohn | Stiles, was awarded California’s “Volunteer of the Year” award by Mothers Against Drunk Driving, California, at the “Celebrating California’s Heroes” law enforcement and community recognition event in Sacramento.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident, please call the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles at (661) 323-4000, or chat with us online at chainlaw.com.

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MEDIA COVERAGE

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2019 MADD KERN COUNTY LAW ENFORCEMENT & PROSECUTOR

RECOGNITION AWARDS LUNCHEON

 

TOP DUI ARRESTING OFFICER OF KERN COUNTY

Officer Robert Tyo – 223 DUI Arrests: Bakersfield Police Department                       

 

PROSECUTOR OF THE YEAR AWARD

Kim Richardson: Prosecutor, Kern County District Attorney’s Office     

 

PROBATION DEPARTMENT AWARD

Brian Mara: DUI Program Supervisor, Kern County Probation Department                     

 

COMMUNITY CHAMPION AWARD

Jeffrey Platt: Eyewitness News

 

TOP ARRESTING OFFICER PER DEPARTMENT

Taft Police Department                                                Officer Andrew Avila              8

Shafter Police Department                               Officer Janet Fernandez                       9

Kern County Sheriff (Wasco)                          Deputy Brandon Routh                        9

Ridgecrest Police Department                          Officer Laura Kenney              13

California Highway Patrol (Fort Tejon)                        Officer Jason Lachaussee        10

California Highway Patrol (Mojave)                Officer Bryan Lombardi          29

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Rodney Black              117

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Robert Tyo                  223

 

CENTURY AWARDS

More than 100 DUI arrests in 2018

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Adrian Tait                  103

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Dallas Plotner              114

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Rodney Black              117

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Robert Tyo                  223

 

DEUCE AWARDS

Between 1 and 49 DUI arrests in 2018

Taft Police Department                                                Sargent Corey Beilby               5

Taft Police Department                                                Officer Moises Martinez          5

California Highway Patrol (Fort Tejon)                        Officer Pablo Hinojosa                        6

Kern County Sheriff (Wasco)                          Senior Deputy Steve Davis      6

Shafter Police Department                               Officer William Draucker        7

Shafter Police Department                               Officer Eric Diaz                      7

Taft Police Department                                                Officer Andrew Avila              8

Shafter Police Department                               Officer Janet Fernandez                       9

Kern County Sheriff (Wasco)                          Deputy Brandon Routh                        9

Ridgecrest Police Department                          Officer Corey Rinaldi              10

California Highway Patrol (Fort Tejon)                        Officer Jason Lachaussee        10

Ridgecrest Police Department                          Officer Laura Kenney              13

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Victor Swall                 20

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Thomas Wahl              20

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Christopher Denman    23

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Jacqueline Smith          23

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Adam Clayton             24

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Tyler Olson                  25

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Michael Galvez                        26

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Michael Livesay          26

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Luis Ballesteros                       26

California Highway Patrol (Mojave)                Officer Donald Mulligan          26

California Highway Patrol (Mojave)                Officer Alejandro Zuniga         26

California Highway Patrol (Mojave)                Officer Jason Carroll                27

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Richard Robles                        27

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Jeremiah Holt              29

California Highway Patrol (Mojave)                Officer Bryan Lombardi          29

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Johnny Moreno                       35

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Kurtis Caid                  37

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Jordaon Hokit              38

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Bernabe Mejia             38

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Francisco Chavez        41

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Jose Bravo                   41

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Kasey Knott                 42

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Hector Organista          43

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Ryan Grant                  44

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Jason Wood                 45

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Brett Otto                     45

 

 

MADD AWARDS

Between 50 and 99 DUI arrests in 2018

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Freddie Garcia             52

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Chad Smithson                        53

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Brandon Carey                        59

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Michael Reynolds        59

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Andrew Marquez         61

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Brianna Pace                66

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Eric Medrano               67

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Ahearn Luca                70

Bakersfield Police Department                                    Officer Jose M. Diaz                72

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Daniel Dinsing             73

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Jessie Velasquez          74

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Michael Ramos                        77

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Matthew Iturriria          80

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Julio Villalobos                        80

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Jaime Cervantes           81

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Jarrod Bone                 82

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Jeff Geer                     83

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Victor Valadez             84

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Arturo Aldrete             92

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Tomas Martinez           92

California Highway Patrol (Bakersfield)                      Officer Gregory Jorgensen       96

Chain | Cohn | Stiles lawyer Beatriz Trejo named to 2019 Super Lawyers “Rising Stars” list

June 5, 2019 | 11:12 am


Beatriz A. Trejo, an associate attorney with the law firm Chain | Cohn | Stiles who focuses on workers’ compensation law, has been named to the 2019  Super Lawyers “Rising Stars” list by Southern California Super Lawyers Magazine, the publication announced recently.

This is Trejo’s first year of earning the “Rising Stars” distinction, which is granted to just 2.5 percent of lawyers under the age of 40 in the Southern California region. In addition, Trejo was also chosen to the “The Top Women Attorneys in Southern California — Rising Stars” list.

“My goal is to always represent injured workers to the best of my ability, and give each person the voice that he or she deserves,” said Trejo. “I am honored to be recognized by Super Lawyers Magazine as a ‘Rising Star,’ and will continue to advocate rigorously and compassionately for injured workers through my work at Chain | Cohn | Stiles.”

Each year, the Super Lawyers selection process includes independent research, peer nominations and peer evaluations.  According to the program, Super Lawyers selects attorneys using a multi-phase selection process where each candidate is evaluated on 12 indicators of peer recognition and professional achievement. The objective of the recognition program is “to create a credible, comprehensive and diverse listing of outstanding attorneys that can be used to resource for attorneys and consumers searching for legal counsel.”

As part of the honor, those selected are highlighted in issues of Southern California Super Lawyers Magazine alongside other awarded legal professionals. They also receive profiles on superlawyers.com, which you can see by clicking here.

To see Trejo’s official Super Lawyers awards for 2019, click here.

Other Chain | Cohn | Stiles attorneys chosen for the Super Lawyers distinction include law firm law partners David Cohn, James Yoro and Matthew Clark. The general Super Lawyers honor, for those over 40 years old, is awarded to no more than 5 percent of lawyers in the Southern California region based on a high-degree of peer recognition and personal achievement. Non-Rising Stars Super Lawyers awardees are announced each January.

With all three partners at Chain | Cohn | Stiles selected as Southern California Super Lawyers in 2018, the law firm received a resolution from the California Legislature for the honor.

As for Trejo, she is a Certified Legal Specialist in Workers’ Compensation, a past recipient of the “Workers’ Compensation Young Lawyer of the Year” award in California, and she has also been recognized by her peers in the “Top Attorneys” poll voted on by local lawyers.  She is past president of the California Applicants’ Attorneys Association (CAAA), Bakersfield Chapter and has been named as one of the 20 Under 40 People to Watch by Bakersfield Life Magazine.

Trejo is an active member of CAAA’s Latino Caucus, and serves on the panels of the Immigration Justice collaborative, which aim to educate immigrants on their constitutional rights.  She is a frequent speaker for Kern Country Small Business Academies and serves on the CSU Bakersfield Pre-Law Advisory Committee.

Outside of the office, Trejo is involved in Latina Leaders of Kern County, Kern Country Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, and Comprehensive Blood and Cancer Center Foundation of Community Wellness.

— Alexa Esparza contributed to this report. 

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If you or someone you know is hurt on the job, or hurt in an accident at the fault of someone else, please contact lawyers at Chain | Cohn | Stiles at (661) 323-4000, or visit the website chainlaw.com for more information.

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*NOTICE: Making a false or fraudulent Workers’ Compensation claim is a felony subject to up to 5 years in a prison or a fine up to $150,000 or double the value of the fraud, whichever is greater, or by both imprisonment and fine.

‘100 Deadliest Days’: Summer period especially dangerous time for young drivers

May 29, 2019 | 5:04 pm


Did you know that the time period between Memorial Day and Labor Day is known as the “100 Deadliest Days” in the United States?

During this time span, which largely includes the summertime, our country’s roadways see a sharp increase in automobile fatalities, many involving teen drivers, according to AAA.

For example, in 2016 during this time period more than 1,050 people were killed in crashes involving a teen driver. That’s an average of 10 people per day – a 14 percent increase compared to the rest of the year, according to the AAA.

What are the reasons for the sharp increase?

It’s not that more teens are driving for longer periods in the summer with school out. In fact, driving behavior greatly increases the risk of a crash, AAA states. Distracted driving, inexperience, driving under the influence, not using safety belts, and driving in adverse conditions are the primary reasons.

Bakersfield’s 23ABC News reporter Lezly Gooden examined this annual issue, and discussed what we can do to decrease the numbers. The report also featured Chain | Cohn | Stiles personal injury Matt Clark, representing MADD Kern County as a board member regarding the alarming DUI-rates in Kern County, which sees more than 4,000 DUI arrests per year. Additionally, Kern County’s rate of DUI-related fatal crashes is the second highest in the country, according to the Kern County District Attorney’s Office.

“The statistics are frankly embarrassing for our county,” said Matt Clark in the 23ABC News report. Chain | Cohn | Stiles is deeply involved with MADD Kern County efforts to raise awareness of the local DUI epidemic, and ways to combat the crimes. “It’s embarrassing that we live in a county in California where you are likely to die in a drunk driving accident than almost any other county in the country.”

Additionally, research shows that when a teen driver has only teen passengers in their vehicle, the fatality rate for all people increased 51 percent. Speed and nighttime driving are also factors, according to the National Highway Traffic Administration.

Here are a few tips for parents of teens and young adult drivers:

  • Evaluate your teen’s readiness. Talk with your teen about personal responsibility, ability to follow rules and any other concerns before beginning the learning-to-drive process.
  • Get informed. Graduated driver licensing, driver education, license restrictions and supervised practice driving are all part of today’s licensing process. And the state of California sets parameters throughout a multi-stage licensing process for young drivers, such as times of day they can drive and how many passengers they can carry.
  • Start talking now. Share any insight that could save your child from having to learn things the hard way. Talk about what it takes to be a safe driver, the rules and responsibilities once they start driving.
  • Focus on passenger safety. Talk to your teen about always buckling up, not riding with a teen driver without your advance permission, and being a safe passenger with teen and adult drivers.
  • Be involved. When you’re behind the wheel, talk about what you see (road signs, pedestrians, other vehicles) that could result in the need to change speed, direction or both. Maintain an ongoing dialogue about your teen’s driving, appropriately restrict driving privileges and conduct plenty of supervised practice driving. California requires that parents and their teens conduct 50 hours of supervised practice driving, including 10 hours at night.
  • Be a good role model. Make changes in your driving to prevent any poor driving habits from being passed on. Show you take driving seriously by always wearing your seat belt, obeying traffic laws, not using a cell phone while driving, watching your speed, not tailgating, using your turn signals, and not driving when angry or tired.
  • Responsible drivers never drive under the influence. As a parent, you can reinforce that message and help steer clear of dangers, including being a passenger of friends who have been drinking. Preventing underage drinking also helps avoid exposure to violence, risky sexual behavior, alcoholism and other serious concerns.

And, as always, share the road with pedestrian, scooter riders, bicyclists and motorcyclists. For more driving safety tips, go to bloggingforjustice.com.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident, please call the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles at (661) 323-4000, or chat with us online at chainlaw.com.

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MEDIA COVERAGE

Chain | Cohn | Stiles se junta con la program ‘Despierta Bakersfield’ para educar nuetra comunidad sobre cuestiones legales

May 22, 2019 | 10:00 am


La firma de abogados Chain | Cohn | Stiles se ha asociado con Univision Bakersfield, la estación de televisión en español, para educar a los Latinos locales sobre cuestiones legales, incluido qué hacer si estás en un accidente con algiuen con poco o sin seguro, los peligros de la fiebre del valle en el lugar de trabajo, y la importancia de contratar con abogados de compensación al trabajador que son certificados por el estado.

KABE Univision 39 es la estación de televisión en español más vista en Bakersfield, donde viven casi medio millón de Latinos, lo que representan el 57% de la población total. Para servir a nuestra comunidad, Univision Bakersfield organiza programas de asuntos públicos, como “Te Informa” y “Despierta Bakersfield”, que se centran en temas corrientes como la inmigración, la salud, las leyes, y la educación.

En la promgrama “Despierta América”, abogada asociada de Chain | Cohn | Stiles, Beatriz Trejo, se unió con la anfitriona Ofelia Aguirre para discutir los siguientes temas. Puede ver todos los segmentos a continuación, o en la página de YouTube de Chain | Cohn | Stiles.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles, la firma de abogados de accidentes, lesiones y compensación al trabajador, tiene dos abogados que están certificados por el estado como especialistas en la ley de compensación al trabajador — Beatriz Trejo y Jim Yoro. La certificación es dado a profesionales legales que han logrado extra los requisitos de licencia. El programa fue el primero de su tipo en los Estados Unidos y ha servido como modelo para otros programas estatales para certificar a especialistas legales en todo el país.

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ENGLISH

Chain | Cohn | Stiles law firm has partnered with Spanish language television station Univision Bakersfield to educate viewers on various legal issues, including what to do if you’re involved in an accident with little or no insurance, valley fever dangers in the workplace, and the importance of hiring a certified workers’ compensation lawyers in the event of a work injury.

The award-winning KABE Univision 39 is the most watched Spanish-Language television station in Bakersfield, which is home to nearly a half million Hispanics, making up 57% of the total population. To serve our community, Univision Bakersfield hosts public affairs programs, like “Te Informa” and “Despierta Bakersfield,” focused around hot topics including immigration, health, law, and education.

For its “Despierta Bakersfield” show, Chain | Cohn | Stiles associate attorney Beatriz Trejo joined host Ofelia Aguirre to discuss the following topics. You can also watch the segments on the Chain | Cohn | Stiles YouTube Page.

The Bakersfield-based accident, injury and workers’ compensation law firm Chain | Cohn | Stiles is home to two lawyers who are state certified as specialists in workers’ compensation law, Beatriz Trejo and James Yoro. The certification is awarded to legal professionals who have gone beyond the standard licensing requirements. According to the State Bar, the program was intended to provide a method for attorneys to earn the designation of certified specialist in particular areas of law, increasing public protection and encouraging attorney competence. The program was the first of its kind in the United States, and it has served as a model for other state programs for certifying legal specialists around the nation.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident, please call the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles at (661) 323-4000, or chat with us online at chainlaw.com.

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*NOTICE: Making a false or fraudulent Workers’ Compensation claim is a felony subject to up to 5 years in a prison or a fine of up to $150,000 or double the value of the fraud, whichever is greater, or by both imprisonment and fine.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles files claim on behalf of family of 8-year-old attacked by dog at school

May 16, 2019 | 10:04 am


Chain | Cohn | Stiles has filed a claim on behalf of the family of a second-grade student who was bitten on the face by a dog while in her classroom.

Leilani, 8, suffered severe lacerations and tearing to her face when she was attacked by one of two large dogs visiting her classroom on May 9 at Wayside Elementary School (Bakersfield City School District) in south Bakersfield. The dogs belonged to a volunteer reader from the Kern County Superintendent of Schools Office.

The family alleges in the claim that Bakersfield City School District and the Kern County Superintendent of Schools Office negligently allowed the volunteer reader to bring into the classroom two dogs, and failed to supervise the dogs in a safe manner. As a result, Leilani suffered severe injuries. The family further alleges that the dog owner is strictly liable pursuant to California Civil Code section 3342 (Dog Bite Statute).

The dogs appear to be similar to Akita or Chow breeds.

This case is a warning to school officials and parents toward allowing animals near young students on school campuses.

“A school should know better than to allow dogs into a second grade classroom.  No matter how gentle the dogs may be, their behavior can be unpredictable,” said Matthew C. Clark, attorney at Chain | Cohn | Stiles. “Unfortunately for Leilani, she is likely to have lifelong facial and lip scarring, and vision difficulties.  Let this be warning to schools, and to dog owners: Do not bring dogs onto school campuses. The risk is simply too great.”

Chain | Cohn | Stiles resolved a lawsuit in 2016 on behalf of a Bakersfield woman for $2 million in what was the largest award for a dog bite case against a public entity in California at the time, according to VerdictSearch, a verdict and settlement database.

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If you or someone you know is bitten by a dog, please call the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles at (661) 323-4000, or chat with us online at chainlaw.com.

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MEDIA COVERAGE

CASE FOLLOW-UP

Bike Month 2019: Bike Bakersfield events, safety tips, crash checklist and more

May 8, 2019 | 10:41 am


Bike Month

May is National Bike Month, a time to celebrate the power of the bicycle, and Chain | Cohn | Stiles is partnering with the local bicycle advocacy group, Bike Bakersfield, to promote bike safety throughout Kern County.

Bicycle accidents are on the rise in Bakersfield and the Central Valley, and sadly, so are deaths. In 2016, 138 bicycle riders were killed on California roads, a nearly 25 percent increase from 2011, according to Bakersfield Police Department and the California Office of Traffic Safety. Among the main factors in these crashes were failing to yield right of way, speeding, improper turning, using the wrong side of the road, and not following traffic signs or signals.

Below you’ll find a listing of events hosted by Bike Bakersfield and sponsored by Chain | Cohn | Stiles, as well as bike riding safety tips, and a checklist to use in the case of a bicycle accident.

Safe riding!

 

BIKE MONTH EVENTS 2019

As part of its mission to reduce the number of accidents in our community, Chain | Cohn | Stiles has partnered for years with Bike Bakersfield to give away hundreds of free bicycle lights and safety helmets throughout Kern County through “Project Light Up The Night” and “Kidical Mass” events, the latter of which also features bike repairs, safety demonstrations, and a group bike ride.

Here are several Bike Bakersfield events taking place this month, sponsored in part by Chain | Cohn | Stiles:

  • May 3, Roller Race Competition: Sprint competition from 5 to 8 p.m. at
    the Library (1718 Chester Ave). Fastest sprinter each hour gets a drink.
  • May 4, Give Big Kern at CALM: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. for kid’s roller
    races and information on Giving Day!
  • May 6, Bike Mechanics Workshop: Frame alignment, fit, greasing seat post, stem and chain checks.
  • May 7, Give Big Kern Giving Day: 12 to 1 p.m. Give, ride to the park, and eat. Lunch from Tacos La Villa for the first 25 people who donate on Giving Day.
  • May 8, Bike to School Day: Post a selfie with the hashtag #BakoBikeMonth2019 for a chance to win great prizes.
  • May 11, Pride Ride: Decorations are encouraged at this fun ride
    beginning at 9 a.m. at The Center. Register on Facebook — @BikeBakersfield.
  • May 12, CycloFemme Day: Join at 10 a.m. at Park at River Walk to Hart Park. Or join us at Hart Park by 11:30 a.m. for light snacks, and a cruise.
  • May 13, Bike Mechanics Workshop: Servicing brakes and shifters.
  • May 15, Ride of Silence Ceremony: Starts at 6:30 p.m. at Cafe Smitten. Join early for 10 percent off your purchase. Honor cyclists killed or injured on public roadways.
  • May 17, Bike to Work Day: Take a selfie with you and your bike on the
    GET Bus using the hashtag #BakoBikeMonth2019, and be entered to win great prizes.
  • May 18, Blood Drive for Houchin Blood Bank: At Bolthouse Drive, bring your kids for a bike rodeo, bike repairs, and help save a life. Partnering with the Kern County Asthma Collaborative.
  • May 18, Full Moon Ride: Family-friendly ride from Beach Park to The Marketplace starting at 7 p.m.
  • May 20, Bike Mechanics Workshop: Headset and bottom bracket overhaul.
  • May 27, Bike Mechanics Workshop: Hub overhaul and wheel tuning 101.

Bike Bakersfield is also hosting “commuter support stands” from 6 to 9 a.m. on Thursdays, providing water, snacks, coffee, minor repairs and support
for those walking and bicycling (courtesy of Costco and Aldi).

  • May 2 at the Park at River Walk, and Beach Park bike paths.
  • May 9 at the bike paths off Finish Line, and Niles and Mount Vernon.
  • May 16 at Planz Park and Bike Arvin.
  • May 23 at California and Union Avenue, and Chester and China Grade.
  • May 30 at locations to be determined.

 

RULES OF THE ROAD

Here are bike laws you need to know to pedal safely and legally, courtesy of the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition:

  • Pedestrians have the right of way: In the crosswalk or not, bike riders and drivers are required to yield to pedestrians.
  • Stop behind the crosswalk: Leave crosswalks free and clear for pedestrians. Always stop behind the line.
  • Mind the signs and lights: Stop at stop signs and obey red lights, just like all other vehicles.
  • Stay on the streets: It’s illegal to ride on the sidewalk.
  • Go with the flow: Ride the same direction as traffic. Walk your bike on the sidewalk if you find yourself on the wrong block of a one-way street.
  • Take the lane: If you’re next to parked cars or you’re riding in a narrow lane — if you feel safer, take the lane and ride outside the door zone.
  • It’s OK to leave the bike lane: If you feel safer outside the bike lane, you can ride in other vehicle travel lanes. Merge when safe and signal when changing lanes.
  • Light up the night: Reflectors and a front white light are required by law. We recommend you use a rear light as well.
  • Keep an ear clear: Even when using hands-free devices, bike riders and drivers are required to keep one ear free of headphones.
  • Be a friend to disabled neighbors: Sometimes people with disabilities need access to the curb. Paratransit carriers (including taxis) may have to enter the bikeway to drop them off. Be a good neighbor and give them room.
  • Pass on the left: Although bike lanes are often on the right side of the road, people biking and driving are required to pass on the left.

The Bakersfield Police Department this month also offers a few tips to ensure the safety of everyone on the road:

  • Drivers should look behind them before making a turn at an intersection, especially if crossing into a designated bike lane.
  • Drivers should use extra caution backing up or leaving a parking space.
  • Bicyclists should go with the flow of traffic and let faster traffic pass.
  • Bicyclists should make themselves visible and wear brightly colored clothing.
  • Bicyclists are advised to use lights from dusk to dawn (front white light and rear red flashing light or reflectors).
  • Bicyclists should always wear a helmet and use hand signals when turning or stopping.
  • Both drivers and bicyclists should avoid distractions like using their cell phone.

 

CRASH CHECKLIST

If you are involved in a collision while riding a bicycle, it’s important to know the steps to follow to ensure that you receive fair response from the police and collect information you may need for future legal issues. Even if you are not injured, follow this checklist — courtesy of the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition — as injuries can come up later.

Immediately after a crash

  • Tell the driver to stay until the police arrive. If they refuse to stay or don’t provide ID, get their and the car’s description, vehicle’s license plate # and state of issue.
  • Call (or ask someone to call) 9-1-1, and ask for the police to come to the scene.
  • Get name and contact info for any witnesses. Ask them to remain on the scene until police arrive, if possible.
  • Ask for the driver’s license and insurance card. Write down name, address, date of birth, and insurance information.

When the police arrive

  • Ask them to take an incident report.
  • Get reporting police officer’s name and badge number.
  • If you’ve been doored, ask the officer to cite the motorist for dooring.
  • Ask the officers to speak to witnesses, if possible.
  • While a doctor’s report of your injury is important for insurance and/or legal action, you do not need to take an ambulance.

In the days after the crash

  • Contact witnesses to ask them to email you their version of what happened while it’s fresh in their mind. Email yourself a description of what happened with relevant information and capture as much detail as you can.
  • Take good photos of your injuries and any bike damage. Get an estimate from a bike shop before making repairs.
  • Request a copy of the incident report from the police.
  • Contact an attorney who has experience with bicycle accidents.

— Martin Esteves contributed to this report.

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If you or someone you know is injured in a bicycle accident at the fault of someone else, contact the attorney at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or chat with us online at chainlaw.com.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles inducted into first Best of Kern County Hall of Fame class, selected to ‘Best Law Firm’ list

May 1, 2019 | 11:21 am


Chain | Cohn | Stiles has been inducted into the inaugural Best of Kern County Hall of Fame, awarded to men, women, businesses, and organizations with a long history of excellence in their respective fields, and who also give back to our community.

In addition, the Bakersfield-based law firm has been selected by people in Kern County as a favorite in the “Best Law Firm” category of the annual Best of Kern County Readers’ Choice Poll by The Bakersfield Californian, unveiled recently in Bakersfield Life Magazine.

“We do what we do because we care about our community, and the people in it,” said David Cohn, managing partner at Chain | Cohn | Stiles. “This is our hometown. We want to make sure we help our local residents in and out of our office.”

Cohn continued: “We don’t do legal work or community goodwill to receive accolades. Still, we want to thank the people of Kern County for voting us into the Best Law Firm category year after year, and also Bakersfield Life Magazine for selecting us into the first Hall of Fame class. We sincerely appreciate it.”

This is the seventh year in a row that the law firm has been selected into the “Best Law Firm” category — each year since the category was introduced to The Bakersfield Californian’s Readers’ Choice Poll. But for more than 25 years, TBC Media has conducted the Best of Readers’ Choice Poll to showcase the people, places and things that make Kern County truly unique.

This year, the poll received 100,000 nominations and nearly 325,000 votes.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles was one of three inductees in the inaugural Hall of Fame class, announced during a Bakersfield Life Magazine reception. Ten local companies were nominated for the Hall of Fame. Joining the law firm was Urner’s, a local furniture store celebrating 100 years this year, and Jim Burke Ford, a local Ford dealership and one of the largest such dealerships in the country.

While these three businesses are different, their community giving is what makes them all similar. Chain | Cohn | Stiles is commemorating 85 years of helping accident and injury victims in Bakersfield. The law firm works closely with Mothers Against Drunk Driving, Kern County, to help DUI crash victims, raise awareness of DUI crimes, and provide educational programs locally. The law firm also partners with Bike Bakersfield year after year to donate hundreds of safety helmets and bicycle lights to students and bike riders in areas of Kern County that need them the most.

Most recently, Chain | Cohn | Stiles donated $10,000 to the Bakersfield Homeless Center in an effort to combat our community’s homeless epidemic.

You can see the complete poll results online here, or in the magazine version here. And you can find our Best of Kern County awards displayed proudly in our law firm lobby in downtown Bakersfield. Hall of Fame winners will be highlighted during a “Best of Winners Circle” publication in The Bakersfield Californian.

You can hear from the law firm partners about the award on our Instagram Story video by clicking here.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident, call the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles at (661) 323-4000, or chat with us online at chainlaw.com.

Kids still playing on the monkey bars? Prevent emergency room visits with these playground injury prevention tips

April 24, 2019 | 12:00 pm


Every 2-1/2 minutes, a child in a United States visits an emergency room for a playground-related injury, according to playgroundsafety.org. And a recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that emergency departments see more than 20,000 children ages 14 and younger for playground-related traumatic brain injury each year.

We all want our children to play, and we all want them to be safe. With playground season in full season, it’s important we all take steps to make sure no one ends their day at the playground with a trip to the emergency room.

Playground injuries can be decreased or avoided if we all take the time to make ourselves aware of the potential hazards. Take time to focus on the outdoor environments where our children play. If we are all active in identifying and addressing unsafe playgrounds or equipment, our children will be that much safer.

Take a moment to familiarize yourself with the risks of playground equipment and these injury prevention strategies, courtesy of Chain | Cohn | Stiles, Bakersfield’s accident and injury law firm:

 

Inspect Your Playground

Playgrounds require regular inspection for necessary maintenance and repairs. Help your local playground by inspecting and reporting any unsafe equipment. A few tips:

  • Check the surfaces under the play structures. They should provide a cushion for where your child jumps or falls.
  • Check playground equipment for hazards such as loose bolts, wood splinters, or sharp edges. Pick up any trash or animal waste that might make your playground unsafe or unsightly.
  • Identify old, unsafe play equipment. Monkey bars account for many injuries, and are being removed from playgrounds.

 

Practice Safe Play

Most playground injuries are caused by falls, but you can also prevent injuries by making sure children are practicing safe play. Here’s how to do that:

  • Dress appropriately. Do not let your children wear clothing which can get caught in the playground equipment. Remove necklaces, purses, scarves or clothing with drawstrings.
  • Wear the right shoes. Do not let them wear boots, sandals, or flip-flops, which make their footing less secure on the playground equipment.
  • Play nice. Teach your children to share, take turns on the equipment, and to get along with others. Pushing and shoving cannot be tolerated.
  • Supervise. Children must always be supervised by an adult. Make sure they are playing safe and playing nice. Swings should be set far enough away from other equipment that children won’t be hit by a moving swing. Little kids can play differently than big kids.

 

Take Action

Take further actions to bring awareness to playground safety. Here’s how:

  • If you see unsafe playground equipment, report it to someone who can address the issue such as the park authority or owner.
  • Help your school survey the children and parents to identify what playground equipment they like and don’t like, which equipment they feel is safe and unsafe.
  • Challenge your school to an injury-free week on the playground.
  • Enlist the help of your elected officials to show their support for safe environments and playgrounds for children.
  • Invite a local newscaster or other local celebrity to come to a few parks or schools to talk about the importance of safe play.
  • Write to your local newspaper to praise safe parks and to identify those which aren’t safe.

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If you or someone you know is injured in a playground accident, call the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles at (661) 323-4000, or chat with us online at chainlaw.com.

‘Drive like you work here’: Use extra caution to protect road workers and others

April 17, 2019 | 6:00 am


Each spring, “National Work Zone Awareness” reminds drivers to use extra caution in construction zones. And with the various construction projects taking place throughout Bakersfield and Kern County, the message of safety is that much more important.

While you’re driving through these zones, the U.S. Department of Transportation and Chain | Cohn | Stiles wants you to remember this year’s safety slogan: “Drive like you work here” to keep yourself and others safe.

“The people working to improve our roadways are just like you and I. We all want to get home to our families after a hard day’s work,” said David Cohn, managing partner of Chain | Cohn | Stiles. “Let’s make sure we always slow down and be extra alert in construction zones.”

Since 2000, Federal Highway Administration has worked with the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials and the American Traffic Safety Services Association to bring national attention to motorist and worker safety and mobility issues in work zones through National Work Zone Awareness. In Bakersfield, construction has been ongoing as workers continue working on the Centennial Corridor, a four-phase freeway project that eventually will connect the Westside Parkway to Highway 99, and the Highway 58 and Highway 99 connector ramps. Construction of “Phase 4” is expected to begin this summer, and the entire Centennial Corridor Project is expected to be finished in 2022, according to local media reports.

Unfortunately, many dangers lurk for road workers, which include crashes that result in injuries and even death. In 2017, the most recent year with complete statistics available, the United States saw 132 worker fatalities in road construction sites, 222 fatal work zone crashes involving large trucks and buses, and 203 fatal work crashes where speeding was a factor, according to the federal department of transportation.

In fact, speed is a contributing factor in almost 29 percent of 2017 fatal work zone crashes, according to the department of transportation. Speeding drivers are less likely to safely navigate the roadway conditions, lane closures, lane shifts, rough surfaces, and other conditions that are common in work zones. Distracted driving is also a big concern.

In California alone since 1921, 189 Caltrans employees have been killed on the job. In 2017, 46 people were killed and more than 3,000 injured from crashes that happened in construction zones, according to data from the California Highway Patrol. California’s “Move Over Law,” which went into effect in 2007, requires drivers approaching Caltrans vehicles, tow trucks or emergency vehicles with flashing lights to move over a lane if safe to do so.

When traveling through work zones, drivers should practice the following work zone safety tips:

  • Plan ahead. Expect delays, plan for them, and leave early to reach your destination on time. When you can, avoid work zones altogether by using alternate routes.
  • Obey road crews and signs. When approaching a work zone, watch for cones, barrels, signs, large vehicles, or workers in bright-colored vests to warn you and direct you where to go.
  • Slow down. Look for signs indicating the speed limit through the work zone. Keep a safe distance from the vehicle ahead of you and follow the posted speed limit.
  • Move over. California has move-over laws when passing work crews and official vehicles parked on the shoulder with flashing warning lights.
  • Avoid distractions. Keep your eyes on the road and off your phone. Just drive.
  • Watch for sudden stoppages. In 2017, 25 percent of fatal work zone crashes involved rear-end collisions.
  • Watch for large vehicles. Don’t make sudden lane changes in front of trucks that are trying to slow down. In 2017, 50 percent of fatal work zone crashes involving large trucks or buses occurred on rural roadways. Between 2013 and 2017, fatal work zone crashes involving large trucks increased by 43 percent.

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If you or someone you know is injured in a work zone accident, please call the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles at (661) 323-4000, or chat with us online at chainlaw.com.

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*NOTICE: Making a false or fraudulent Workers’ Compensation claim is a felony subject to up to 5 years in a prison or a fine of up to $150,000 or double the value of the fraud, whichever is greater, or by both imprisonment and fine.

Chain | Cohn | Stiles donates $10,000 for Bakersfield Homeless Center jobs program

April 3, 2019 | 11:41 am


Chain | Cohn | Stiles law firm has donated $10,000 to the Bakersfield Homeless Center in an effort to combat our community’s homeless epidemic.

The donation will go toward the homeless center’s job skills training program and street cleaning team focusing on downtown Bakersfield. In short, the program helps homeless center residents move forward with their lives while making a difference in our community. The program is designed to be a transitional program, where participants gain real-world skills, build confidence, and develop experience to find long-term employment.

The donation comes on the heels of a Kern County Homeless Collaborative report that found a 50 percent increase in the local homeless population over last year’s count, with over 1,330 people locally experiencing homelessness. Large efforts by City of Bakersfield and Kern County to tackle the issue are underway.

“Sadly, we see the effects of homelessness every day on the streets in downtown Bakersfield and outside our own office,” said David Cohn, managing partner of the law firm. “If there is something we can all do to help homeless center residents out of homelessness, while at the same time making sure our city is presented as the jewel that it is, then we should all help. All downtown businesses are impacted by homelessness, and I would encourage others to step forward, and help support a solution.”

Added Louis Gill, executive director of the Bakersfield Homeless Center: “The dedication of Chain | Cohn | Stiles to invest in our community and the lives of everyone who lives in it is on full display as they lead the way with support for our Downtown Street Ambassador program.  We are grateful for their partnership in this program which provides employment opportunities for people seeking to improve their lives, beautifies areas around downtown businesses, and reaches out to homeless individuals through compassion and resources.”

Currently, there are more than 80 people participating in the homeless center’s jobs program. The Downtown Street Ambassadors program was first implemented by the Downtown Bakersfield Development Corporation in partnership with Bakersfield Homeless Center, Garden Pathways, The Mission at Kern County and Keep Bakersfield Beautiful.

The donation also falls on the 85-year anniversary for Chain | Cohn | Stiles, which has been housed consistently in downtown Bakersfield during its history – from the Haberfelde Building, to the Sill Building, Bank of America, and its current home today.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident, please call the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles at (661) 323-4000, or chat with us online at chainlaw.com.

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