California ranked 4th worst state to drive in the United States, according to report

February 5, 2020 | 3:37 pm


Have you had a bad driving experience lately? Well, you may not be alone.

California has been named the fourth worst state to drive in the United States, according to a new report from WalletHub, a personal finance and information website. WalletHub compared driving experiences across all 50 states to help drivers identify the states that provide the best commuting conditions. It looked at 31 factors, including four key dimensions:

  1. Cost of ownership and maintenance
  2. Traffic and infrastructure
  3. Safety
  4. Access to vehicles and maintenance.

California was found to have the highest percentage of rush hour traffic congestion, the second highest average gas prices, and the fifth highest car theft rate, according to WalletHub. On the positive side: California is reported to have the fewest days with precipitation, the most auto repair shops per capita, and the most car washes per capita.

In all, California ranked No. 47 worst state to drive. Here’s the complete breakdown:

  • Ranking of 49 for cost of ownership and maintenance.
  • Ranking of 46 for traffic and infrastructure
  • Ranking of 4 for safety
  • Ranking of 1 for access to vehicles and maintenance

According to the study, the only states worse for driving than California were Washington, Rhode Island and Hawaii. On the other hand, the best states for driving were Iowa, followed by Tennessee, North Carolina, Texas and Nebraska.

Among the data analyzed by WalletHub were from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Federal Highway Administration. WalletHub also asked a panel of experts regarding the future cost of car ownership, electric and self-driving vehicles, and perhaps most importantly: safety. Among the comments made regarding safety, and how to reduce the number of traffic fatalities, the experts commented:

  • “Several infrastructure improvement and policy measures are found associated with the reduction in traffic fatalities including speed reduction and traffic calming measures (like raised intersections and middle islands), dedicated and protected bicycle lanes and safer pedestrian crossings. Indirect interventions like alcohol taxes and mode alternatives (night transit, taxis, ride-hailing) are related to drunk driving reduction. A combination of such measures along with educational campaigns for safe driving can assist States with reaching Vision Zero goals.
  • Banning the use of cell phones while driving with severe penalties for violators.
  • Reducing road use taxes for vehicles with sensors that prevent unsafe driving.

Other recent reports have highlighted other not-so-good California facts, including the fact that in Los Angeles, people spent 119 hours a year last year stuck in traffic, and Sacramento being home to some of the worst drivers in the country (according to a report by QuoteWizard) when looking at speeding tickets, accidents, DUIs and citations.

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If you or someone you know is injured in an accident at the fault of someone else, or injured on the job no matter whose fault it is, contact the attorneys at Chain | Cohn | Stiles by calling (661) 323-4000, or fill out a free consultation form at chainlaw.com.

Auto accidents are No. 1 cause of death of American teenagers, new study finds

June 9, 2014 | 10:17 am


It’s a sobering statistic: Auto accidents are the No. 1 killer of American teenagers, according to a new study released recently called “Teens in Cars.”

The study found that car accidents kill almost as many drivers as passengers, and kills more children than homicide or suicide.

The study — paid for by the General Motors Foundation, Safe Kids and based on a national survey of 1,000 teenagers between 13 and 19 — also found the following:

  • In half of fatalities, the teenager was not wearing a seat belt. One in four teenagers said they don’t use a seat belt on every ride. Top reasons included that they forgot, weren’t driving far, and that seat belts were uncomfortable.
  • Also, teens who didn’t wear seat belts were more likely to say they texted while driving than who wore seat belts.
  • The odds of a crash or near-crash in newly-licensed teen drivers was more than eight times greater when dialing a cell phone.
  • 49 percent of teens reported feeling unsafe when riding with a teen driver.
  • When someone was driving dangerously, four in 10 teens said they asked the driver to stop, but almost the same number said they did nothing.

In 2012, nearly 2,400 teen drivers died in motor vehicle accidents. A little more than half of the teenagers killed, 56 percent, were driving at the time of the fatal crashes; 44 percent of the victims were passengers. Only 10 percent of respondents said they’d been in cars driven by teenagers under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

This isn’t the first study to highlight such findings. A recent study by the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration also put auto accidents as the No. 1 killer of teenagers.

There is some good news, however. A recent Insurance Institute for Highway Safety study reported noted that fatalities for 2012 had dropped 7 percent from 2011. Similarly, the Safe Kids study said teenage auto deaths had dropped 56 percent from their peak in 2002, when nearly 5,500 children between the ages of 13 and 19 died.

The survey also provides some strategies for parents and families to stay safe while riding as a passenger and a driver.

  • Make using a seat belt for every ride a habit, starting when kids are young.
  • Be a safety role model by observing speed limits, putting phones away while driving, and following the rules of the road.
  • Talk to teens and kids about ways to speak up if a driver of any age isn’t driving safely.

The Bakersfield personal injury lawyers at Chain | Cohn | Stiles also have some advice in the case you or your teen are involved in an auto accident. Remember to take the following 3 steps if you have been involved in an automobile accident or motor vehicle accident:

  • Obtain the name, address, insurance information, vehicle identification number (VIN) and driver’s license number of any and all persons involved in the accident, as well as the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of all witnesses.
  • Make sure that a report is filed with the police, sheriff, or highway patrol, but DO NOT talk to anyone else (especially insurance adjusters) about the accident or sign anything without first consulting an attorney.
  • Seek medical attention immediately and explain to your physician or surgeon all of the symptoms and complaints you have been feeling since the accident occurred.

For more tips and answers to frequently asked questions related to vehicle-related accidents, go to chainlaw.com, or visit our specialized site dedicated to helping those who have been involved in car accidents — www.bakersfieldcaraccidentlaw.com.